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ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Impact of educational interventions on utilization patterns of anticancer agents in patients with breast cancer at the specialty oncology care setting in South India


 Department of Pharmacy Practice, JSS College of Pharmacy, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Mysore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Gurumurthy Parthasarathi,
Department of Pharmacy Practice, JSS College of Pharmacy, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Mysore - 570015, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/picr.PICR_8_20

Aims/Objectives: This study was conducted to assess the utilization patterns of anticancer agents in patients with breast cancer and to provide practice recommendations/educational interventions to optimize medication use in patients with breast cancer. Materials and Methods: This was an ambispective study conducted for a period of 3 years at a private, specialty oncology care hospital in South India. In the initial phase, the selection of anticancer agents, dosage of anticancer agents, and management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) were reviewed retrospectively (using paper medical records) with respect to the National Cancer Comprehensive Network guidelines. The administration of anticancer agents and anti-emetics were reviewed with respect to the hospital drug administration policies. The deviations from the standards were reported, and practice recommendations/educational interventions were developed. Treatment patterns were reevaluated prospectively after providing educational interventions. Descriptive statistics were used to report and compare the results from both phases. Results: During retrospective phase, we observed 80% compliance in the selection of anticancer drugs, 74% compliance in drug dosing, and 63.5% compliance in the administration of anti-cancer agents. After the implementation of educational interventions, we observed 85% compliance in the selection of anticancer agents, 82.3% in their dosing, and 86.9% compliance in the administration of anticancer agents. For the management of CINV, we observed 75% compliance in the selection of drugs (vs. 53% during preintervention), 92% compliance in their dosing (vs. 90% during preintervention), 85.1% compliance in the administration of anti-emetics (vs. 50% during preintervention), and 80% compliance in the management of delayed CINV (vs. 60% during preintervention). Conclusions: Treatment patterns of breast cancer were improved with respect to treatment standards after educational interventions to oncology care team.
    
 

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    -  Sharma A
    -  Patel H
    -  Parthasarathi G
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